Don’t Buy New Cookware Until You Know All the details about each kind first (3)

Don’t Buy New Cookware Until You Know All the Details About Each Kind First
Oct 02, 2017
Heather Barnett
by Heather Barnett
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Copper or porcelain? The pros & cons of 10 cookware types
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Silicone cookware
Copper or porcelain? The pros & cons of 10 cookware types
Image: ZenShui/Laurence Mouton/PhotoAlto Agency RF Collections/Getty Images
Pros

Made from sand and oxygen, silicone is nonstick, nonreactive and safe to use in the oven, microwave, refrigerator, freezer and dishwasher. They’re also very lightweight and won’t stain.

Cons

They are a bit on the expensive side and can be awkward and unstable.

Stainless steel cookware
Copper or porcelain? The pros & cons of 10 cookware types
Image: Westend61/Getty Images
Pros

The workhorse of kitchens throughout the world, you can find this cookware in just about every home in America. Stainless steel cookware is made from an alloy of metals, which usually include some combination of steel, carbon, nickel and chromium. They’re engineered to be nonporous, durable, corrosion-resistant and easy to clean.

Cons

Stainless steel is one of the more expensive types of cookware you can buy, especially when combined with other metals like copper (which is sometimes used to improve its naturally poor heat conductivity). It has a tendency to discolor under high heat and to pit when exposed to salt water. Additionally, if scratched, chromium and nickel could leach into your food.

Titanium cookware
Copper or porcelain? The pros & cons of 10 cookware types
Image: dancestrokes/iStock/Getty Images Plus
Pros

Titanium is extraordinarily light and strong (the highest strength-to-weight ratio known to man, actually). It also heats very evenly and quickly. It’s nonporous, nonreactive, nonallergenic and can have an antibacterial coating. Titanium cookware resists scratching, denting and warping and is safe to use in the oven. If that’s not enough, it’s nonstick, so you can start a dish without butter, oil or water. It can often be wiped clean with a washcloth.

Cons

As you might expect, titanium is very expensive — the only significant drawback. Many people decide the extra expense is justified and treat the cookware as an investment, since titanium will often still look like new after years of use.

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